An Irish Food Store is a Must-See on Your Trip to Ireland

irish food store

When it comes to traditional Irish food, there are many delicious dishes that you will find nowhere else in the world. This is the reason why travelers want to try as much of this cuisine as possible on their trips to Ireland.

Potatoes take the lead role in many of these recipes, and they are often served alongside cabbage, spring onions and a generous dollop of butter. These dishes are hearty and comforting, with a familiarity that makes them irresistible.

What is Traditional Irish Food?

Traditional Irish food is a rich and diverse cuisine with a focus on comfort. It includes recipes from scones to Guinness brown bread and stews.

Potatoes have been a staple of the Irish diet for centuries, and are still popular. They can be mashed in many ways, and a classic Irish dish, champ, is just that: a mash of potatoes, cabbage and scallions flavored with butter or cream.

Another potato favorite, Irish stew, is a hearty and nourishing meal that’s great for the cooler weather months. It’s typically made with lamb, but can also be made with beef or mutton. It’s often served with a roux, which is a cooked flour and fat mixture that adds to the thickening of the stew.

Boxty

If you’re looking for a taste of traditional Irish cuisine, check out Boxty. This restaurant serves dishes like perfectly cooked boxty, corned beef and beef dumplings.

Boxty is a traditional potato pancake made from mashed and grated potatoes, flour, baking soda, buttermilk and eggs. It’s also made in other ways, including raw and baked into a loaf, or boiled as a dumpling.

The perfect accompaniment for a hearty supper, they’re often served with fried eggs and bacon. You can also add smoked salmon and sour cream to the batter.

Soda Bread

Irish Soda Bread is an old-time favorite for many people who love traditional Irish food. Often made using soft wheat flour, soda bread is an easy recipe that’s perfect for dipping into soups and stews or eating on its own.

Soda bread is traditionally made with four basic ingredients: soft wheat flour, salt, baking soda and sour milk or buttermilk. It’s quick and easy to make, and can be adapted to suit different preferences with healthy vegan or gluten-free alternatives.

Drisheen

Drisheen is the traditional Irish blood sausage, made with pig’s, cow’s and/or sheep’s blood, milk, salt, fat, and breadcrumbs. It is boiled and sieved, then cooked using the main intestine of the animal as a “skin” for the sausage.

Drisheen differs from black pudding in one main way, says O’Reilly: instead of being made from whole blood, drisheen is made from a part of the blood called serum.

O’Reilly, who is the last remaining drisheen maker in Cork, sells his meat at a stall in The English Market. He also has a cafe at the market, Farmgate, which serves dishes like tripe and drisheen.

Black Pudding

Black Pudding is a traditional sausage that is typically stuffed into a casing. It is a type of blood sausage and can be served boiled, fried, or baked.

Traditionally made with pork blood, it is also flavored with a variety of spices and often includes a binder like oats or barley.

It can be a delicious and nutritious breakfast meal and is one of the most popular traditional Irish foods.

It has been a contentious subject, with many people either abstaining from or enjoying black pudding. Theologians and other religious scholars debated its use as part of a full breakfast, with some even refusing to eat it at all.

White Sausage

The traditional Irish food store, White Sausage, sells sausages, rashers and puddings. They also sell Donnelly cured bacon which is made in the United States using a tried and true Irish recipe.

Originally invented in Munich, weisswurst (pronounced “wee-swurst”) is a sausage that’s a mix of finely minced veal and pork. It’s seasoned with herbs and spices and has a fresh hint of lemon.

It is usually eaten with a German mustard and soft pretzels, or dipped in cold wheat beer. It is a perishable food that should be eaten soon after cooking.